Teaching so it Sticks! Using High Impact First Time Learning to Maximize Students’ Outcomes

Relationships with each student in your classrooms make an impact on their ability to learn well. These seven power actions will build positive results with you students: 1) Create Rules and Expectations, 2) Set expectations high, 3) Establish a joy factor, 4) Build trust, 5) Care about each student, 6) Create Learner Profiles and 7) Use a growth mindset and assume the best.

Relationship Game Changers: 8 Tools to Maximize Connections with All Students

Relationships with each student in your classrooms make an impact on their ability to learn well. These seven power actions will build positive results with you students: 1) Create Rules and Expectations, 2) Set expectations high, 3) Establish a joy factor, 4) Build trust, 5) Care about each student, 6) Create Learner Profiles and 7) Use a growth mindset and assume the best.

Simple Strategies for Developing a Growth Mindset in Your Students

Simple Strategies for Developing a Growth Mindset in Your Students

Dr. Carol Dweck, author of Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, says that a growth mindset is the foundation of wanting a challenge, persevering through the challenge, and desiring long-term growth and success. One of my favorite training workshops to deliver to all schools, but especially schools that are dealing with high-poverty students, is my Growth Mindset workshop.

Humility's Effect On Leadership

Humility’s Effect on Leadership

Understanding these qualities of humility and implementing them through school principals, superintendents, or other educational leaders can truly help the whole school grow in tremendous ways. Many schools are concerned about achieving new and higher standards when achievement was not even made against the previous standards. As leaders, we should emulate humility by being open and honest with the journey ahead.

Tis the Season to be Grateful…Falalalalalalala For Classroom, Home Workplace and every little Place

Gratitude is defined as “the quality of being thankful; readiness to show appreciation for and to return kindness.” Antonio Damasio, professor of psychology and neurology at USC said, “There has not been much attention given to the emotion of gratitude, and yet it is extremely important in social behavior. Gratitude rewards generosity and maintains the cycle of healthy social behavior.” One of my biggest goals this past year was to show more gratitude for the small things that people did for me.